ARAS EDITORIAL TEAM – Expressions of Interest 2018-2021

Nominations are sought for the position(s) of Editor and Co-editor for the Australasian Review of African Studies (ARAS), the official journal of the African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP).

The term of office is usually three years.

The Australasian Review of African Studies (ARAS) aims to contribute to a better understanding of Africa in Australasia and the Pacific. It is published twice a year in June and December by AFSAAPARAS is a multi-disciplinary journal that seeks to provide critical, authoritative and accessible material on a range of African affairs that is interesting and readable to both academic and non-academic audiences. All articles are double blind peer-reviewed by two independent and qualified experts prior to publication.

The journal is supported by an expert International Editorial Board of members who represent esteemed scholars in African Studies from around the world.

The appointed Editor and Co-editor(s) will work with the Managing Editor and Copy Editor as a team. We are specifically looking for individuals with a strong academic background who will assist the editorial team to promote the journal, provide expert editorial advice, lead the process of peer-review and manage all aspects of communications with authors and peer-reviewers as required.

The Editor and Co-editor(s) will be an academic or scholar with a demonstrated interest in African Studies, and/or the African Diaspora in Australia, New Zealand or the world, and with relevant research interest to support the journal’s multidisciplinary focus. The appointed Editor or Co-editor(s) will also work with AFSAAP executive members to ensure the timely production of this bi-annual journal.

AFSAAP is an international network of academics, students, consultants, activists, diplomats, artists, community leaders, and others who share a mutual interest in the promotion of African Studies in the Australasia and Pacific region. AFSAAP is based in Australia and was founded in 1978. It is a not-for-profit-association, and as such all roles are voluntary. Further information can be found at http://afsaap.org.au/publications/aras/

Potential candidates are asked to submit a short statement (no more than 1000 words)

  1. identifying your relevant experience and understanding of African Studies and the journal ARAS,
  2. outlining why you would like to be a part of the ARAS team.
  3. indicating how you would like to take ARAS forward over the next 3 years
  4. Include a list of your publications.
  5. Any Editorial experience (including journal editorships, edited books, guest editorships and membership of editorial boards) – (previous experience not essential).
  6. Any indication of support from your University College/Department /School/Faculty for this role to be undertaken by you (institutional support not essential, but nice when you can get it).
  7. A copy of your Resume.

Applications will be considered by the AFSAAP Executive and current ARAS Editors. Deadline for submissions is October 1st 2018. Email to

editor@afsaap.org.au

July 19th, 2018

AFSAAP Executive 2019 – Nominations now open

As normal, all office bearing positions will be declared open at the AGM at the forthcoming conference, and all AFSAAP members are invited to nominate for one of the positions:
President,
Vice-President,
Secretary,
Treasurer
Postgraduate Representative(s).
ARAS Journal Editor.

Position descriptions are detailed below. If you would like to nominate yourself or someone else, please send a short description of why you believe you would be suited to the position, and what you can bring to AFSAAP to secretary@afsaap.org.au by 1 October 2018. These will be disseminated in advance of the AGM. Please note that if you would like to nominate another person, you must get their written approval.

Please also contact the president@afsaap.org.au if you would like to discuss any of the office bearer roles and duties in more detail.

POSITION DESCRIPTIONS  – The Role of AFSAAP Officers

President:

The role of the President is one of leadership, of influencing the direction of AFSAAP, and directing links with Africa and with federal, state and local government institutions, NGOs, African communities in Australia and the Business sector that has interests in Africa. In conjunction with all/and or the relevant other executive members, the President will managing any short-term or contract staff employed by the Association for discrete tasks (e.g. preparation of reports). The president will also oversee the day to day running of AFSAAP and ensure an annual conference is held, and the journal is published twice a year, and the newsletter goes out to members monthly.

 

Vice-President:

The Vice-President has a supporting role to the President, stands in place of the President in his/her absence from the AGM or while the President is either on leave or out of the country for an extended period.

 

Secretary:

The Secretary is responsible for the day-to-day running of business matters arising from the AGM, correspondence, incoming enquiries about the Association. The Secretary coordinates communication between committee members and with the annual conference organizer. The Secretary maintains files concerned with the maintenance of records and continuity between holders of the office of Secretary.

 

Treasurer:

The Treasurer manages subscriptions, donations and the membership lists. This role requires coordination with the Secretary who may receive initial inquiries about membership. Coordination with the Editor of the Australasian Review of African Studies is also necessary. The Treasurer is responsible for managing the AFSAAP accounts.

 

Postgraduate Representative(s): will be chosen at each AGM or during the year to assist with the promotion of Postgraduate research in particular in conjunction with the Annual Conference, and they will organise the postgraduate workshop at each conference in conjunction with the Conference Convener.

 

Journal editor:

The Editor of the Australasian Review of African Studies will ensure that 2 journals are published annually in June and December, and facilitate all processes required for an international peer reviewed journal. The Editor will manage all co-editors and maintain the files, peer review process, and publication and distribution of the journal. The marketing and indexing of the journal is also the responsibility of the Editor.

 

Ordinary Members:

Ordinary members of the Executive Committee are local representatives of AFSAAP. However, not all local representatives are Executive Committee members. Ordinary members are expected to promote AFSAAP within their own academic institution and their own city or state, and also to bring ARAS to the notice of their local university and state libraries. Posters promoting AFSAAP are available for printing and display and for giving to individuals or local interest groups.

Ordinary members should try to send local research and news items to the Editor of the Monthly AFSAAP Newsletter and/or for publication of each issue of ARAS in June and December. This means collecting items and submitting them to either Editor at least one month before the date of issue and preferably earlier.

 

Other Supporting Roles

 

Editor of the Monthly Newsletter Habari kwa Ufupi (News in Brief):

The Editor(s) will be appointed by the Executive. Prepare a monthly newsletter detailed events, publications or other items of interest for the membership – to be distributed electronically through AFSAAP membership emails and kept online through the AFSAAP website.

 

AFSAAP Website Manager: The Web Manager(s) will be appointed by the Executive. They will manage the website.

July 19th, 2018

AFSAAP President Peter Limb discusses the challenges facing Cyril Ramaphosa’s presidency

As the euphoria of the drama-filled political changes in South Africa die down, focus now shifts to what the future holds. AFSAAP President and South African expert Peter Limb discusses some of the challenges facing President Cyril Ramaphosa’s administration on ‘The Wire’. You can listen to the podcast here.

Earlier, Geoffery Hawker, Associate Professor of Politics at Macquarie University, previous president of AFSAAP (2006-8) and on the International Editorial Advisory Board of AFSAAP Review had been on the same program and gave his thoughts. You can also listen to the interview here.

March 1st, 2018

AFSAAP President Prof. Peter Limb analyses the recent leadership changes in South Africa

Jacob Zuma finally tendered his resignation as President of South Africa on February 14, 2018 marking the end of a tumultous 9 year-reign. Professor Peter Limb was on ABC’S The World on Wednesday to shed light on the new man in power, Cyril Ramaphosa. You can watch the special interview via this link: http://www.abc.net.au/news/programs/the-world/2018-02-16/cyril-ramaphosa-succeeds-jacob-zuma-as-south/9453132

February 16th, 2018

AFSAAP President Prof. Peter Limb on Pres. Jacob Zuma’s worsening political troubles

South African President Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma has had a torrid presidency, surviving numerous attempts to have him ousted from power. He is back again in the news, but this time the mounting pressure on him to quit is nothing like his presidency has seen before. Many analysts are convinced the end of his reign is probably just days away. AFSAAP President, Peter Limb, himself a specialist on the African National Congress with extensive publications as well as forthcoming work on ANC political history sat down with the ABC’s Ros Childs and gave his thoughts. You can watch the segment here. It plays at 35 mins 30 seconds onwards

February 8th, 2018

Podcast of recent interview between AFSAAP Representative and KayaFM959 re: Statement of the African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP) on the Stereotyping of African Australians/South Sudanese

AFSAAP recently put out a Statement of the African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP) on the Stereotyping of African Australians/South Sudanese. KayaFM

spoke to AFSAAP Secretary Edson Ziso to talk about the root of the stereotyping and lived experience of Sudanese people in Australia. You can listen to the podcast here. 

February 5th, 2018

Statement of the African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP) on the Stereotyping of African Australians/South Sudanese

The African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP), a network of academics, students, consultants, activists, diplomats, artists, community leaders, and others who share a mutual interest in the promotion of African Studies in the region, founded in 1978, includes among its aims the goal “to contribute towards an understanding of Africa in the community at large”. The AFSAAP Executive is deeply concerned that the recent stereotyping of South Sudanese in Australia, especially in Melbourne, does not help to contribute to better understanding. Ascribing negative behaviours to any community should always be avoided, and whilst various recent comments by officials and media may be well intentioned for their immediate purpose, there is very real danger that some people will come to view such communities, and by implication all African and indeed all black communities, as inherently having negative qualities. We therefore call for the greatest care in making such statements and the greatest consultation by all stakeholders with South Sudanese and African communities.

AFSAAP Executive

 

 

January 10th, 2018

Australia Awards Outcomes for Africa! Frank Akampa’s experience in Australia and thereafter returning to Uganda

Academic engagement

At the beginning of 2013 I embarked on a graduate program at the University of Queensland, specialising in GIS and Environmental Management. This program was funded by AusAID, Australian government funding that was intended to prepare me for my PhD studies at an Australian university. As a student, a large proportion of my time was allocated to studies which were a mix of theoretical classroom lectures and laboratory sessions for GIS and Remote Sensing courses.

Australian assignments and classwork were interesting, especially the fact that contrary to most African education systems, where practical laboratory sessions are often a formality with little or nothing gleaned. Here, laboratory sessions were conducted in an excellent way with tutors who would assist the students in their learning. This ensured that students actually understood the important aspects of laboratory exercises. As a student, I worked as a tutor in undergraduate Environmental Science and GIS courses where I learnt a lot.

Participation in conferences

I also had an opportunity to further my research whereby three abstracts of conference papers were accepted at conferences at the University of Queensland, Brisbane; at Murdoch University, Perth; and at Victoria University in Wellington, New Zealand. The topics of the papers were as follows: “Community-based natural resource management and sustainability of forest use in Uganda: Case study of Kibale National Park” at the University of Queensland; “Community-based natural resource management & sustainable forest resource use at Bwindi Impenetrable and Kibale National Parks, Uganda” at Murdoch University; and “Using GIS and Multi-criteria analysis for land suitability analysis for residential and conservation at Pinjarra Hills, Brisbane” at Victoria University. At these conferences I had opportunities to interact with scholars from different parts of the world and who remain influential in my life. I was also able to polish my writing and presentation skills which are vital to the upcoming PhD program.

Engaging in community social activities

Besides classwork, I also had opportunities to engage in activities such as playing soccer, visiting friends, participating in organising activities for associations such as the African Students’ Association (ASA), GPEM mentor programs, and the Geography Club. As a student, I could not of course miss the weekly and weekend prayer meetings, the meetings in our apartments over the weekdays, and traveling for church services to St Lucia Uniting Church, Hillsongs church, and many more at Brisbane city. I also worked as a volunteer at Australian Conservation Foundation where I was involved in conservation activism, organising workshops and preparing funding proposals.

Part-time work

The first job opportunity was working as a tutor at the UQ in semester two. This was a rewarding opportunity where I assisted undergraduate students in laboratory sessions involving image acquisition, interpretation and classification. I considered this a learning experience since remote sensing was one of the courses I was enrolled in.

I was also privileged to secure work at one of the baking and coffee spots in Brisbane city namely Brewbakers at Albion. This was an interesting opportunity because I was able to learn how to bake cakes, prepare pizzas, sandwiches, make coffee etc. I was glad to work for humble bosses – Caroline and Richard – with Caroline in charge of sales and Richard heading the baking section. Surprisingly, it took me over three months before I realised that Richard was one of the owners of Brewbakers, owing to his humble character. During my time in Australia I should say I have learnt a lot from the numerous interactions in class and out of class which have shaped and continues to shape my future.

Reintegrating in the Ugandan society

Upon my return to Uganda in 2014, I resumed my work as a Lecturer at Kabale University where I was tasked with developing the GIS course which was to be developed into a Unit. During this time, I attracted two volunteers, Joseph Abrams and Adam McKay, from the USA and Canada, respectively. These two GIS experts were linked to me through Shoreh Elhami, one of the GISCorps co-founders, who is based in the USA. With the assistance from ESRI, a GIS vending company, ArcGIS 11.2 software licence and its extensions were donated to Kabale University for GIS teaching. In March and April 2015, the volunteers under my supervision participated in the training of 21 Kabale University academic staff, in addition to four academic staff of Bishop Barham University and two research fellows of Kachwekano Zonal Agricultural Research Institute (see photo below).

Volunteers with Frank Akampa

Volunteers with Frank Akampa

It was a nice experience coordinating this volunteer training program, which I can say was a success. Unfortunately I could not work with Kabale University longer and by October 2015 I had left the University and started my career with Earth Consult Uganda Ltd, a GIS and forestry consulting firm.

While working with Earth Consult I also had an opportunity to establish ACODEP (Advocate for Community Development and Environmental Protection), a NGO with headquarters in Wakiso, Hoima Road. AODEP is a community development and environmental management organisation with pilot projects in Wakiso District. The organisation so far has a team of five professionals specialising in Natural Resource Management and Community-income generating development projects.

I am returning back to Australia for a PhD program in Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of New South Wales, pending availability of the necessary funding. My PhD project has the working title “Climate change adaptation and vulnerability assessments: Implications for farmers and pastoral communities in dryland areas of Nakasongola district, central Uganda”. Since my return I have been working on academic manuscripts for publishing in referred journals with support from my supervisor. So far, three papers have been submitted for publication.

In summary, I am very thankful to the Australian Government for the generous funding provided for the pre-Doctoral studies that I was undertaking. Acknowledgement also goes to the UQ Academic staff, AusAID staff and the Ugandan community in Queensland.

August 30th, 2016

Vale Professor Cherry Gertzel

Cherry Gertzel November 2013 Perth

On the 25th August 2015 the African Studies community lost a great scholar and dear friend.  Cherry Gertzel died peacefully at her home surrounded by her books.  Cherry taught and researched from 1958 to 1975 as a staff member at, in turn, Makerere University – Uganda, Nairobi University – Kenya, and at The University of Zambia.  She returned to Australia in 1975 and became a staff member at Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia between 1975-1993. She subsequently moved to Curtin University between 1993-1997, and remained an Adjunct Professor in the Humanities and Social Sciences at Curtin University, and was an Honorary Research Fellow in the History Department at the University of Western Australia, until her retirement. She engaged in research relating to the politics and administration of the three east African states, but also on more widely ranging issues of social change.  She continued with her research until the end.  Between 1982-1986 Professor Cherry Gertzel  was the President of the African Studies of Australasia and the Pacific (AFSAAP), and was the Editor of The Australasian Review of African Studies (ARAS) between 1984-2004. She was a tireless campaigner for Africa and African studies in Australia.  She will be missed.

 

Selected Publications by Prof. Cherry Gertzel

1984 AFSAAP Presidential Address

Makerere 1984: the Problems of Reconstruction

Letter From Kamapala 1987

Journey to Gulu 1989

Tracking Tsetse and other insect pests with Icipe in Kenya

Parliamentary Report on Australia’s relations with Southern Africa

Gertzel_Response to the Jackson Report

Note from the ARAS Editor 2004

Last note from the ARAS Editor 2004

Gertzel Submission to Review of Australia’s Relations with the countries of Africa (2009)

August 26th, 2015